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Armor/AFV: British Armor
Discuss all types of British Armor of all eras.
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UK jerrycans ????
piwi
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 05:27 AM UTC
Hi all,
look at the rear of the Dingo, what kind of jerrycans are stored on the rack ?



Grauwolf
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:10 AM UTC
Could be British copies of the German jerry can or captured
German, could also be US jerry cans.

The photo is in Italy so at this point in the war anything
goes.

18Bravo
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:37 AM UTC
Note offset handle, and no prominent rib around the perimeter. Also fairly rounded corners. Looks to me like a British POW can. Accurate Armour probably does them.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:37 AM UTC
Wrong height-width ratio for a German/British/US jerycan.
I think they are of this type:

Edit: BUT with a diagonal handle and not along the side as the one in the photo above


Compare the height-width ratio of these jerry cans.
The main visible difference between the German originals and the British copies is mainly in the stamping.

vs the German


Made in the US



but the Germans also had this shape of the stabilising stamping


20 liter cans is a whole area of nerdery so I'll can it for now ...
/ Robin
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:42 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Note offset handle, and no prominent rib around the perimeter. Also fairly rounded corners. Looks like a British POW can. Accurate Armour probably does them.



British POW can, or flimsy, horrible things ...




http://www.exploringoverland.com/overland-tech-travel/2012/8/17/irreducible-imperfection-the-flimsy.html
TankManNick
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:44 AM UTC
I modeled an M3A1 Scout car in Italy and it had these 'short jerrycans' on the back. That's the only way I can describe them from the picture. Now I'm wondering if they are Italian jerrycans. Vision model make some it seems but I'm not sure of the size. They seem to be the same size as others. Mystery!

Apparently there are Czech 10l jerrycans. That's about half sized!
piwi
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:53 AM UTC
Thanks Guys

I thought it could be italian jerrycan as said TankManNick

Robibn The picture you've got seems to be be the good one
Do you where does it come from ?
18Bravo
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 06:55 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Note offset handle, and no prominent rib around the perimeter. Also fairly rounded corners. Looks like a British POW can. Accurate Armour probably does them.



British POW can, or flimsy, horrible things ...




http://www.exploringoverland.com/overland-tech-travel/2012/8/17/irreducible-imperfection-the-flimsy.html



No, I know the flimsies - I use them a lot on LRDG builds. POW cans look far different. Maybe not what the OP is looking for, but certainly not what is in your top photo. Maybe the one on the left in second photo.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 08:21 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Thanks Guys

I thought it could be italian jerrycan as said TankManNick

Robin The picture you've got seems to be be the good one
Do you where does it come from ?



Sorry, haven't got the foggiest idea ...
I found it in some forum where the poster asks if anyone knows what kind of can it is ....
Super helpful .....

Could it possibly have been some wartime redesign of the smaller British cans with sharp corners? Instead of welding/soldering sheet metal to a top and bottom they switched to stamping two halves whcih were then welded together? Adapt the process from the larger jerry can to these smaller ones?
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 08:31 AM UTC
OK, did some more digging:

https://usmtwt.com/en/boutique/jerrycan/jerrycan-a-eau/


Different orientation of the handle. Maybe to differentiate between water and non-drinkable stuff in the dark??

Various thoughts, ideas and questions in this forum:
https://forums.g503.com/viewtopic.php?t=298823


18Bravo
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 09:31 AM UTC
It turns out I made a lucky guess. Accurate Armour does indeed make a can remarkably similar to that, called a POW (petroleum, oil, and water) can. Id supply a link but Im pretty sure anyone here can navigate their way to it - hate doing stuff like this on a phone.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 09:34 AM UTC
https://accurate-armour.com/aa-products/135th-accessories/a005

These are the cans welded together from sheet metal sides + top and bottom.
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 09:52 AM UTC
Found this text on Wikipedia
"At the beginning of the Second World War the British Army was equipped with two simple fuel containers: the 2-imperial-gallon (9.1 l; 2.4 US gal) container made of pressed steel, and the 4-imperial-gallon (18 l; 4.8 US gal) container made from tin plate. The 2-gallon containers were relatively strong, but were expensive to produce."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerrycan
JohnTapsell
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 09:25 PM UTC
I know I've seen some information somewhere on these relatively rare (compared to standard versions) fuel cans.

They were manufactured in the same way as the German syle (a welded central seam) but were about half the size.

I think they were an interim design that bridged the gap between the older 2 gallon POW (and excellent fuel carrier), the 4 gallon 'Flimsy' (a very poor design) and ultimately the jerrycan as we know it.

I'm sure I read that it was locally manufactured in Egypt as an immediate solution, pending the arrival of the new jerrycan. It would make sense for them to be smaller as I suspect they were intended to fit into the same racking used for 2 gallon POW cans. If you look at the image of the Dingo that Pierre posted, the cans are located where you would expect the 2 gallon POWs to be carried and to my eye are roughly the same size.

UPDATE: I'm getting old and my memory is poor - I asked a virtually identical question over on Missing Links back in December 2018:

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/missinglynx/british-desert-fuel-cans-t317436.html

The answer is immediately below my original post.

John
Removed by original poster on 06/21/20 - 09:59:54 (GMT).
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 - 10:16 PM UTC
Maybe the crews liked them that's why they've kept them throughout the Italian campaign. They're much easier to fill canteens and water boiling vessels from than using the standard 20l jerry cans, that's for sure.
piwi
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Posted: Sunday, June 21, 2020 - 02:00 AM UTC
Guys ! Thanks to all of you.
if I cross all the information it seems to be a civilian british conteiner (may be for water).
BTw I found that ( just in case) :
The US and Britain developed coloured metal tags that could be clipped onto the centrehandle of jerry cans. These indicated what the contents of the can were.
Embossing onthe tags allowed them to be read by feel at night, eliminating the need for a light.

American colour coding was:
Fuel
●Red: 80 Octane
●Orange: 72 Octane
●Black: Diesel

Oil:
●Yellow: OE 10 HD
●Grey: OE 30 HD
●Brown: OE 50 HD

Transmission
●Light Blue: G O 80●
White: G O 90

British colour coding was

●Red: 80 Octane petrol
●Yellow: 72 Octane petrol
●Black: Diesel
●Green: Aviation petrol (100 octane+)
●Light Grey: Kerosene or paraffin for lamps and stoves


The German water jerry can was marked from top to bottom: "Wasser 20L" (Water 20l) in letters 24 and 18mm high, with the date of manufacture below in figures 18 mm high. On the center panel, the logo or initials of the manufacturer, and at the bottom "Wehrmacht", "Luftwaffe" or "SS", depending on which arm of the forces owned the Jerry Can.
Normally the 'cross' would be painted white while the can would be painted as follows:


- Feldgrau (Wehrmacht)
- Sand (Afrika Korps)
- Salmon (SS in western campaign)
- Black (Waffen SS)
- Grey (Blue) (Luftwaffe)
- Red (Unpainted and as supplied from the manufacturer)
18Bravo
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Posted: Sunday, June 21, 2020 - 02:06 AM UTC
As we actually had a Vickers at the Q Course, I seem to recall MOST of these were used to cool the gun. That may be why they're so prevalent on LRDG vehicles.
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