_GOTOBOTTOM
Armor/AFV: AA/AT/Artillery
For discussions about artillery and anti-aircraft or anti-tank guns.
Hosted by Darren Baker
... --- ...
b2nhvi
Visit this Community
Nevada, United States
Joined: June 17, 2016
KitMaker: 1,124 posts
Armorama: 1,014 posts
Posted: Monday, August 10, 2020 - 04:28 PM UTC
HELP!! Am working on a 1/35 Ho Ni III. I am trying to locate ammo for the Type 90 75mm gun. No luck what so ever in that search. I've come to the conclusion I'll need to try substituting. The Type 90 shell is straight and 424 mm (Is that just the brass or whole round?) Closest match I've found are the Russian 76.2mm field gun round (but it is 385mm, making it near 40mm too short. )or the German PaK 36r round (714mm. ) Figuring I can just cut those down will be in storage racks so the missing rim is not an issue. However only ones I'm finding are brass. And I don't have a way to cut those. Ant styrene sets out there? (gonna need a dozen or so. Don't want to buy 5 or 6 Pak 36R kits to get the shells.)
ayovtshev
#490
Visit this Community
Sofiya, Bulgaria
Joined: September 22, 2016
KitMaker: 1,432 posts
Armorama: 1,390 posts
Posted: Monday, August 10, 2020 - 04:55 PM UTC
https://www.scalemates.com/kits/miniart-35261-ammo-boxes-with-shells--1116674

Or

https://www.scalemates.com/kits/miniart-35064-57mm-and-76mm-shells--107748

HTH
Scarred
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,792 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Monday, August 10, 2020 - 05:14 PM UTC
--.- ... .- ....- --.- ... .- ..--.. -.-

sorry, code flashback.

Have you checked 3d printing services like thingyverse or shapeways?
LonCray
Visit this Community
Virginia, United States
Joined: August 24, 2005
KitMaker: 348 posts
Armorama: 256 posts
Posted: Tuesday, August 11, 2020 - 12:35 AM UTC
Oh, no, not Morse! __._ ... ._ _____ Patrick, you wouldn't happen to have been on 05H or 98H back in the day? I was - though I lost my Morse proficiency from sitting a voice desk for two years.
165thspc
#521
Visit this Community
Kentucky, United States
Joined: April 13, 2011
KitMaker: 9,465 posts
Armorama: 8,695 posts
Posted: Tuesday, August 11, 2020 - 01:49 AM UTC
. . . _

Wishing you victory in your efforts.

p.s. A inexpensive Jewler's Saw will cut the brass rounds with ease.
Scarred
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,792 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Tuesday, August 11, 2020 - 02:16 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Oh, no, not Morse! __._ ... ._ _____ Patrick, you wouldn't happen to have been on 05H or 98H back in the day? I was - though I lost my Morse proficiency from sitting a voice desk for two years.



Yeah, I was a hawg. We never accepted the 98 cfm designation when they restructured the MOS's. Sometimes I wake up hearing V's and try to reach for my receivers. I did tactical tours running jammers and DF gear. I liked those better than the strategic tours but I will say that Field Station Berlin was not a boring tour. Lots of action and I do mean action. We had a two minute reporting time to NSA headquarters on our intercepts. Kinda difficult being 100+ miles into E. Germany.
LonCray
Visit this Community
Virginia, United States
Joined: August 24, 2005
KitMaker: 348 posts
Armorama: 256 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 - 01:14 AM UTC
I did two years at Field Station Augsburg, but I sat a voice rack in a morse section so my morse is nearly gone beyond 'di-dah is alpha'. Never got up to Berlin but I got to see a lot of Germany (plus Paris) and the Sovs never did invade so I guess we did our jobs well.
ayovtshev
#490
Visit this Community
Sofiya, Bulgaria
Joined: September 22, 2016
KitMaker: 1,432 posts
Armorama: 1,390 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 - 07:36 AM UTC
AFAIR,

--- --- -
(ЩЩР/Cyrillic Morse)

was the most feared answer- it meant something like "Immediately sack your radio operator"

Never received it though,

Scarred
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,792 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 - 09:30 AM UTC
We've intercepted plenty of 73's and 88's between operators in certain countries. Made us wonder.

FYI: 73 means best regards and 88 means love and kisses.
They went something like this:
qtc 0 qtc imi k
qtc 0 73 73 88 88 nil sk

I don't have traffic for you do you have traffic for me ? Over
I don't have traffic for you. Best regards best regards love and kisses love and kisses nothing heard silent key or end of transmission.
ayovtshev
#490
Visit this Community
Sofiya, Bulgaria
Joined: September 22, 2016
KitMaker: 1,432 posts
Armorama: 1,390 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 - 05:23 PM UTC

Quoted Text

We've intercepted plenty of 73's and 88's between operators in certain countries. Made us wonder...



Sounds like a comm check to me.Or comm readiness/vigilance check.

SOP for fixed line communications was to verify whether all connections are working.
At the start of each watch, one had to call each line and upon responder answering the call to ask:"I hear you, do you hear me?"

I had a midnight shift one day and while performing the conn. check I made the mistake to ask the responder "You hear me, do I hear you?".
The answer I received from the lady on the other end of the line was "I can't answer that question for you, soldier!"...

LonCray
Visit this Community
Virginia, United States
Joined: August 24, 2005
KitMaker: 348 posts
Armorama: 256 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 13, 2020 - 01:02 AM UTC
My favorite code was when it was obviously a student operator: they'd stutter a lot, type a lot of "e's" and go really slow - and then suddenly things would go really fast as their instructor took over. The one weirdness about Bulgarian voice I remember: two different sets of phonetic numbers. No idea why they did that.
Scarred
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,792 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 13, 2020 - 03:40 AM UTC
Oh yeah, no doubt it was a comm check. In the middle of the night our targets could get quite silly. But when the smelly stuff hit the fan all humor went out the window.

We had targets that could hit 60 words a minute. Those were the days when we'd jack up on as much caffeine as we could get to stay on top of them. Obviously machine generated and only a couple of us could hack them. I could stick copy about 30 words per minute and on a terminal 60+. Those were the days that justified our drinking and fighting. Augsburg had a Flr-9, known as an elephant cage due to is size (thing is bloody huge), we only had a spiral and tulip antenna down in the Grunewald. We didn't have our own DF capabilities and relied on all the field stations from Turkey to Denmark to get our fixes. Sometimes we didn't have enough Duffies so I'd sit the DF section and sometimes we were so busy the Duffies would hack dits.

Our targets would send a dash for zero rather than 5 dashes so when we were copying them we had to think "did they mean T as in tango which is a single dash or did they mean a cut zero"? Nugs would be confused for a few days but you soon picked up what they meant.
LonCray
Visit this Community
Virginia, United States
Joined: August 24, 2005
KitMaker: 348 posts
Armorama: 256 posts
Posted: Friday, August 14, 2020 - 01:05 AM UTC
Yeah, we were quite proud of our AN/FLR-9. It's still there though I don't think the Germans use it now. When I was young and stupid I loved the fast clear machines - it was a point of pride to copy 60gpm even for a short time. And you're right about the feces and the fans. I was there for 2 years and we had Chernobyl, the Challenger and the LaBelle Disco bombing. I still remember the condolences on Radio Moscow when Challenger blew up. And I had some small involvement with what happened after the LaBelle bombing but it's almost certainly still classified.
Scarred
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,792 posts
Armorama: 1,186 posts
Posted: Friday, August 14, 2020 - 09:09 AM UTC
We were backing up Augsburg remotely in FS San Antonio for those incidents when they happened and when we got the wideband tapes for Chernobyl a few days after it happened we found out a lot more that was missed. It was a mess. I served with a couple guys wounded in Labelles when I got to Berlin. They were awarded Purple Hearts for being wounded in a terrorist bombing. First time they were awarded for such an action. They day the Challenger exploded wasn't the best day for me. I was diagnosed with cancer that morning and started chemo to kill a tumor in my chest it was hard going to chemo in the morning and then sitting pos afterwards. It didn't work well and the thing grew to the size of my fist so they wound up carving my chest apart to get the tumor. They were going to take my arm because it was spreading but they got it all and I convinced a review board I was still able to serve. Got back from con leave and returned to work on April 1st. At Ft. Lewis we worked remotely from FS Korea so when I got there in late June 91 I was already up to speed on the mission so as soon as I got read on I went to work, didn't need to sit side saddle with anyone. I was on my way to FS Kunia in 93 when I got got caught in the RIFt. Was kinda pissed about that, I was working for one of the Amry's greatest interrogators at Lewis and he wanted me to transfer to interrogation with Farsi so he was helping me put my packet together when I found out I couldn't reup.
 _GOTOTOP