_GOTOBOTTOM
Яusso-Soviэt Forum: Cold War Soviet Armor
For discussions related to cold war era Russo-Soviet armor.
ZIL-135
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2018 - 07:54 AM UTC
A new model ZIL-135 is in the works. It is a kit of the company Trumpeter Luna-M. The kit is very good on the fit of the parts. An early version will be built. Now the first photos of the model.


















pgb3476
Visit this Community
Texas, United States
Joined: March 11, 2007
KitMaker: 977 posts
Armorama: 976 posts
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 - 01:21 AM UTC
Looks like you can't turn the wheels?
ayovtshev
#490
Visit this Community
Sofiya, Bulgaria
Joined: September 22, 2016
KitMaker: 1,432 posts
Armorama: 1,390 posts
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 - 05:12 AM UTC
First and last pair of wheels were steerable(and I see steering rods installed).
Whether these pairs can turn in the kit-I will know soon.
Will build a Luna M/Frog-7 for a friend of mine,

LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 - 07:21 AM UTC
Hello

As you've already realized, the wheels are not built to be mobile, they are in the straight ahead position. The steerability in the model is very difficult to realize and the construction cost is no use. Every model maker knows that the first and last axle was steerable on this vehicle. The model is a complicated kit and you should not complicate it as it already is. Here is a picture of the original vehicle, what the model will look like.



canismalus
#465
Visit this Community
Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Joined: September 12, 2014
KitMaker: 398 posts
Armorama: 394 posts
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 - 05:28 PM UTC
Hi Joachim,

Good progress so far on your Luna-M. Im currently building the same Trumpeter ZiL-135 chassis for a BM-27 Uragan (I have the Luna-M in the stash, too) as part of the Launchers campaign and its been going together well - except for the steering rods and ties, whose fit wasnt the greatest. I agree with you that itd be difficult to make this chassis steerable, and I also built mine with the front and rear wheels pointed straight ahead.

Anyway, Im looking forward to your continuing build.

Jerry
ayovtshev
#490
Visit this Community
Sofiya, Bulgaria
Joined: September 22, 2016
KitMaker: 1,432 posts
Armorama: 1,390 posts
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 - 06:56 PM UTC
I also took a look this morning to the 9K52 kit(Luna-M).
Will build it (with 2 friends) for another friend.
We discussed whether is it possible to make the rocket arm lifting, and combat possition supports deployable with the ultimate goal of engine bay being not glued, but removable to show off the 2 8-cylinder engines.
The guy, who will get the built kit, served on one of these Launchers and we want him to receive a nice present for his desk.
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 05:44 AM UTC
Hello
Thank you all modellers for your answers. I also think that the model does not have to be steerable. The effort to build it is far too big, the structure over the engines can be built removable, that should not be a problem. At the moment I can not say, if the start ramp can be shown moving, because I am not yet in this phase of construction. The construction must be done in certain stages, a continuous construction is not possible in my opinion. Here are some pictures of the model, have it put together temporarily for you.









LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 05:36 AM UTC
The construction of the model continued, the chassis was built further. The coloring was done and the detailing as well. The structure of the start device can begin. Here are the latest photos of the model.


















LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Thursday, November 01, 2018 - 08:18 AM UTC
Now photos from the bottom of the model.




165thspc
#521
Visit this Community
Kentucky, United States
Joined: April 13, 2011
KitMaker: 9,465 posts
Armorama: 8,695 posts
Posted: Friday, November 02, 2018 - 03:51 AM UTC
No criticism is meant here, just making a comment - I have always found this automotive structure to be what appears to me to be a very strange machine. A bit of a departure from other Russian 8x8 vehicle designs.

Over rough terrain it seems either the first or the last axle would spend a lot of time totally off the ground.

Very good workmanship Joch!

Just one fool's opinion.
canismalus
#465
Visit this Community
Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Joined: September 12, 2014
KitMaker: 398 posts
Armorama: 394 posts
Posted: Friday, November 02, 2018 - 11:19 PM UTC
Joachim, thats a very clean, good-looking build and finish! Nice.

I agree with Michael, this seems like an anomaly in the very practically-oriented world of Soviet vehicle design. What puzzles me is the decision to have each engine power the axles on one side of the vehicle. If one engine conks out, would that mean the ZiL could drive around in circles Homer Simpson-style?

https://youtu.be/GWBLYRzuDsI

Or like Curly, for that matter:

https://youtu.be/T2iZPRif2i4

Jerry
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 03, 2018 - 08:28 AM UTC
Yes, the thoughts are completely right. There were big problems on public roads with this vehicle. The problem was not the failure of an engine, but the switching of the two gears. It often happened that only one transmission was switched and the vehicle turned when releasing the clutch. Mostly defective or loose transmission parts were the cause. Russian technology is a story in itself. It must have proven to be, there were a lot of vehicles. Will introduce here other vehicles ZIL-135 as a model.



165thspc
#521
Visit this Community
Kentucky, United States
Joined: April 13, 2011
KitMaker: 9,465 posts
Armorama: 8,695 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 03, 2018 - 08:55 AM UTC
Difficult to comprehend why they would do that.

The US Stuarts had twin Cadillac V8 engines but they turned on a common transmission and if one conked out the tank was not stranded.

Often if just moving the vehicle around the motor pool it was common to only start one engine as the move would not require much power.
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Saturday, November 03, 2018 - 09:05 AM UTC
The technology was different. The Russians put at this time again and again on gasoline engines. They had big advantages in winter. There was no freezing of fuel. It was with the armored personnel carriers up to the BTR-70 exactly the same. Only from BTR-80 diesel engines were installed. Here are some pictures of the model, it went on a bit further.









canismalus
#465
Visit this Community
Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Joined: September 12, 2014
KitMaker: 398 posts
Armorama: 394 posts
Posted: Monday, November 05, 2018 - 04:28 AM UTC
Joachim, that looks fantastic - nice work!

Jerry
165thspc
#521
Visit this Community
Kentucky, United States
Joined: April 13, 2011
KitMaker: 9,465 posts
Armorama: 8,695 posts
Posted: Monday, November 05, 2018 - 04:55 AM UTC
My comments referred to the unusual suspension arrangement with the center four tires closely grouped and with the exceedingly strange power arrangement of one engine driving only the wheels on one side of the vehicle, therefore requiring both engines to be running properly to drive the vehicle forward.

The aspect of gasoline versus diesel fuel never entered into my comments. Clearly gasoline is the better cold weather fuel.
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Monday, November 05, 2018 - 08:38 AM UTC
Yes, everything right write, the two motors must run correctly. But how is it when driving through curves? Since the correct running of the two engines also uses nothing. There is no differential between left and right. The wear on the drive parts will have been very large. But it worked, that was the main thing.
165thspc
#521
Visit this Community
Kentucky, United States
Joined: April 13, 2011
KitMaker: 9,465 posts
Armorama: 8,695 posts
Posted: Monday, November 05, 2018 - 11:12 AM UTC
Excellent point Joch! No need for differentials but still there must have been uneven strain on the two drivelines when moving through curves.

A challenging question!
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Friday, November 09, 2018 - 08:47 AM UTC
Hello model maker

First of all thank you for your answers. To the interesting question with the cornering of the ZIL-135, I can only imagine that a disc clutch in the two intermediate gears for the left and right side has been installed. It should balance the speed of the main gear when driving through bends. the principle of balancing over disc clutches was known in the Russian automotive industry. This saved a lot of space and material on gears. So much for that.
The construction with the rocket for the Luna-M did not go on, the paint has to be injected and the detailing has to be done. It was started with a new model ZIL-135, it is a training vehicle for the drivers of the launch pads. Here is a picture of the original and photos of the model in its current state.

Best regards truck MAN












canismalus
#465
Visit this Community
Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Joined: September 12, 2014
KitMaker: 398 posts
Armorama: 394 posts
Posted: Friday, November 09, 2018 - 09:50 PM UTC
Joachim, good to see that youve already started on the companion build, and a very interesting one at that - I wasnt aware of a cargo/training version of the ZiL-135, so Im looking forward to your conversion.

Jerry
LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Sunday, November 11, 2018 - 08:44 AM UTC
The chassis has received color and at the Luna the assembly of the rocket has begun. Here are the latest photos of the two models and another photo of the original of the training vehicle.













LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 08:19 AM UTC
Here is the still-announced photo of the original




LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Sunday, November 18, 2018 - 08:13 AM UTC
The construction on the model continued, the platform was built and treated with paint. The details on the model and equipment follow. Here are the latest photos of the model.








LKWMAN
Visit this Community
Sachsen, Germany
Joined: April 13, 2014
KitMaker: 279 posts
Armorama: 279 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 09:05 AM UTC
Here are new photos of the model, the construction is coming to an end. There are still some details to build.







165thspc
#521
Visit this Community
Kentucky, United States
Joined: April 13, 2011
KitMaker: 9,465 posts
Armorama: 8,695 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 10:46 AM UTC
Now you are pushing MY buttons! I am much more likely to get into weird and unusual cargo trucks than rocket launchers.

Great work! Way Cool!

(Though I do like that reload crane on the launcher! - Hey, build a structural arch up and over the transmissions then mount the crane between them to service loading and unloading of the cargo box! Cut the sheet metal engine covers as necessary to accommodate the crane tower?????)

Just thinking out loud. I bet there is at least a design drawing somewhere at the ZIL factory proposing that!
 _GOTOTOP